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 Post subject: Re: How to locate the gradient line on a symmetrical ball
PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 1:29 am 

Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2009 10:43 pm
Posts: 1698
Location: Rochester NY
Remember, I can't take credit for the research and conclusions, but I can help others understand and properly utilize it.


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 Post subject: Re: How to locate the gradient line on a symmetrical ball
PostPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 3:48 pm 

Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2010 12:17 am
Posts: 11
Justin, why wouldn't you use the actual PSA of a drilled symmetrical ball which is always in the thumb?

I'm not sure I understand your thought process with your drill angles either. Are you saying that a TR2 drilled with a 70* drill angle will roll and perform the same as a TR2 drilled with a 30* drill angle assuming the pin and val angles are the same and that you use the weight hole to change reaction alone?

I have found that all four components of Mo's dual angle technique, (drill angle, pin distance, val angle, and weight hole placement) are equally important in obtaining a desired reaction. I know for me a ball with a 30* drill angle is going to start rolling at my toes, while a 75* drill angle is going to skid till it hits dry boards. I use the pin distance to manage the friction and the val angle to determine how quickly I want the ball to come off the breakpoint. I'll then use a weight hole to fine tune what I have created. If I definitely know I want a P3 I choose a ball with a top weight that will allow me to do that.

Do you think I am I over analyzing? Curious what your thoughts are on this.


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 Post subject: Re: How to locate the gradient line on a symmetrical ball
PostPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 4:18 pm 

Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2009 10:43 pm
Posts: 1698
Location: Rochester NY
catchaclue wrote:
Justin, why wouldn't you use the actual PSA of a drilled symmetrical ball which is always in the thumb?


If you have a DeTerminator to locate the PSA, that is ideal. The gradient line location procedures outlined here are for those without the hardware. Since we know the PSA of a drilled ball ends up near to the thumb hole a majority of the time these procedures are accurate.

The PSA movement based on hole placement is the reason for 2 different methods. Keeping the PSA near to the thumb hole in the "Parallel" method increases the drilled differential and ratio while retaining a largeer after-drilling drill angle. Moving the PSA away from the thumb using the "Projected PSA" method results in a PSA location closer to the balance hole, reducing the after-drilling drill angle creating the earlier reaction.

Make sense?



catchaclue wrote:
Are you saying that a TR2 drilled with a 70* drill angle will roll and perform the same as a TR2 drilled with a 30* drill angle assuming the pin and val angles are the same and that you use the weight hole to change reaction alone?


Yes. With no hole placed, the two will react so similarly there will be no noticeable difference in reaction.


catchaclue wrote:
I have found that all four components of Mo's dual angle technique, (drill angle, pin distance, val angle, and weight hole placement) are equally important in obtaining a desired reaction. I know for me a ball with a 30* drill angle is going to start rolling at my toes, while a 75* drill angle is going to skid till it hits dry boards. I use the pin distance to manage the friction and the val angle to determine how quickly I want the ball to come off the breakpoint. I'll then use a weight hole to fine tune what I have created. If I definitely know I want a P3 I choose a ball with a top weight that will allow me to do that.


In an Asymmetrical ball the drilling angle is significant. In a Symmetrical ball, the drilling angle strictly sets up imbalance to facilitate the hole placement.



A combination of small drill angle and the "Projected PSA" method of gradient line will create an earlier reaction for speed dominant bowlers or low friction environments.


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 Post subject: Re: How to locate the gradient line on a symmetrical ball
PostPosted: Tue Dec 28, 2010 7:57 pm 

Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2010 12:17 am
Posts: 11
Thank you for explaining Justin. It seems so bizarre that for years and years drillers put so much emphasis on cg placement and in reality it didn't really matter at all! Thanks again Justin


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 Post subject: Re: How to locate the gradient line on a symmetrical ball
PostPosted: Tue Dec 28, 2010 10:44 pm 

Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 4:01 pm
Posts: 526
The key phrase in Justins reply is . . "with no hole placed." It's the wt. hole (especially one @ P3 or P4) that makes the difference. In the example given, the 30* DA will (w/o hole) will react very similar to the 75* DA (w/o hole) but since the 75* DA probably does not require a hole the noticiable difference will be when you place a wt. hole in the 30* DA ball. There is a fairly good video on brunsnick.com showing a rt. handed bowler bowling w/2 balls, both have pin under bridge, one has CG kicked 45* rt. and the other 45* left. Neither has a hole. They react very, very similar.

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 Post subject: Re: How to locate the gradient line on a symmetrical ball
PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 10:21 am 

Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2009 10:43 pm
Posts: 1698
Location: Rochester NY
In my RX1S vid, I used the same pin distances and surface for both balls. I merely changed the VAL angle and placed a hole in one to obtain the 2 different reactions.


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